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Full text of "The Letters Of Horace Walpole Vol I"

THE   LETTERS
OF
HORACE WALPOLE
1.   To CHARLES
MY DEABEST CHARLES,
The pleasure that the interview, tho* so very short, that I had with you the night before you left town, gave me, has I think made your absence seem still more insupportable. That little snatch of conversation was so agreeable, that I am continually thinking how happy we should be in a much longer. I can reflect with great joy on the moments we passed together at Eton, and long to talk 'em over, as I think we could recollect a thousand passages, which were something above the common rate of schoolboy's diversions. I can remember with no small satisfaction that we did not pass our time in gloriously beating great clowns, who would patiently bear children's thumps for the collections, which I think some of our cotemporaries were so wise as to make for them afterwards. We had other amusements which I long to call to mind with you: when shall I be so happy ?
LBTTBK 1.—Not in 0.; now printed from original in possession of Viscount Gobham. This letter, which, is written in a boyish hand, appears to be the earliest of Horace Walpole's which, has been preserved. He was at this time not quite fifteen years old.
i Born 1714, d. 1768; third son of Sir Thomas Lyttelton, fourth Baronet, of Hagley, "Worcestershire.
He took orders in 1742, was Dean of Exeter, 1748-62 ; Bishop of Carlisle, 1762-68 ; President of the Society of Antiquaries, 1766. Lyttelton, with whom Horace Walpole was evidently on very friendly terms at this time, waa almost certainly the ' Charles' of the Eton ' triumvirate' mentioned in the letter to Montagu of May 6, 1736. (See Athenaeum, Feb. 16, 1901.)